Home » How To » Waiting to get rid of old telematic devices could cost operators a lot

Waiting to get rid of old telematic devices could cost operators a lot

Despite urging regulators to switch to electronic recording devices (ELD) long before the December deadline, up to 20 percent of regional operators continue to use automatic on-board recording devices (AOBRD). This is 10 percent more than the figures reported by super regional or national operators.

Each week, FreightWaves partners with CarrierLists and EROAD to survey a new sample of operators on their telematic devices before the December 16 deadline to switch to ELD. Surveys continuously show that most operators already comply with ELD. Holdouts, however, seem to stand firm.

The three-week moving average of the carriers surveyed who reported ELD compliance remained above 90 percent this week. The last survey included results from 214 operators. Of those carriers, 196 were already running ELD. The rest continued using AOBRD. The results include carriers of various sizes that run all routes.

While overall compliance figures do not change much from one week to another, this week's survey reduced the three-week moving average of regional operators that meet ELD by 6% last week. As of this week, 21 percent of regional operators report that they still have AOBRD. This number is greater than 15 percent last week.

The changing percentages from one week to another do not represent more operators that change to AOBRD. Instead, these changes are the result of a different group of carriers surveyed each week. Changing respondents help provide a broader view of the industry as a whole.

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Regional and super-regional fleets have reported lower compliance numbers than national fleets since the beginning of the survey. Carriers surveyed across the country have reported an ELD compliance of 98 percent for several weeks.

For several weeks, the super-regional fleets seemed to approach the national fleets. Last week, the escaped superregional reported 93 percent compliance. That number dropped to 91 percent after this week's survey. Still, super-regional fleets meet 12 percent more than their regional peers.

Regional operators continue to report the lowest compliance, reaching 79 percent ready for ELD this week. Regional carriers are defined as fleets that run within a radius of 150 to 1,000 miles. Super regional companies operate routes of more than 1,000 miles but not throughout the country.

While it is not expected that until the fourth quarter to make the change from AOBRDs to ELDs will have a detrimental effect on the general market, procrastination could cost individual carriers greatly. Waiting could make holdouts susceptible to hardware shortages, lost time and fines on the road.

"We talked to many operators that have not yet begun to plan the transition to ELDs." Given the impact on operations and the way drivers and managers do their job, it is better to start now, "said Soona Lee, director of compliance at EROAD." We have helped many fleets to develop a careful plan that maintains the interruptions to a minimum, while ensuring that everyone understands how to adapt to the HOS reporting requirements they will face. "In general, this takes more time and effort than carriers initially plan."

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Even if carriers that run shorter routes do not plan to change until closer to the deadline, those fleets must develop in-depth plans to ensure that the change is made smoothly when it occurs.

The EROAD guide "Planning your transition from AOBRD to ELD" provides eight key considerations and six critical questions to help select the right solution and make the transition as easy as possible.

Visit the AOBRD resource center at ELD to download the guide.

Source: https://www.freightwaves.com/news/waiting-to-get-rid-of-old-telematics-devices-could-cost-carriers-big

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