Home » Meeting to get rid of signs

Meeting to get rid of signs

Hampton Bays residents asked members of the Shinnecock Indian Nation to think of their neighbors, visitors and animals when they decide to erect two 61-foot tall double-sided electronic signs along Sunrise Highway.

At a rally on May 15 at the rest stop on the south side of the road next to the construction site and just west of the Shinnecock Canal, members of the village beautification and civic associations said they understood the need from the tribe of a source of income, but asked that the project be more in character with the area.

"These signs are against everything that this community represents," said Hampton Bays Civic Association president Maria Hults, adding that billboards would be more appropriate for Times Square or Las Vegas. "They certainly have the right to billboards and announce what they want, but at the same time we would like them to be good neighbors and also consider our needs." Are these billboards really necessary to get someone's attention? We all know about McDonald & # 39; s and Disney and Mercedes. "

The 37-year-old resident who lives in the block of the site added that the signs emit light at 5500 Kelvin, brighter than sunlight, at night would be detrimental to the circadian rhythm of animals and people.

The president of the Hampton Bays Beautification Association, Susan von Freddi, who organized the rally, said she hopes there is an alternative.

"Does it have to be lit with LED?" He asked. "Can not you put a simple, old and ordinary sign?" The size and scale and the fact that it lights up is what worries us more than anything, I think it's a safety problem. "There's an accident on this road. the days, and I think there will be more because of this. "

Southampton Town Supervisor, Jay Schneiderman, even suggested a duty-free service station or a cannabis processing plant in lieu of billboards, which Idon Media LLC proposed to the nation's members, which will share the income that was they will report in the millions of dollars each. year. The supervisor said he is more concerned that the signs are a distraction for the driver.

"This is a busy road and we are very concerned about the incidents that arise from the driver's distraction," Schneiderman said. "Of course, there is also an aesthetic concern (we do not normally see structures of more than two stories) and the city does not even allow internally lit signs or advertising signs on its road."

Members of the Shinnecock Nation say that the land, on the Westwoods property of the tribe, is exempt from any municipal, state or federal regulation, although Schneiderman has said that tribal leaders have told him they would voluntarily comply with the regulations of the dark sky. of the city signs at night

A spokeswoman for Congresswoman Lee Zeldin said that as of May 15, she heard that the Bureau of Indian Affairs of the United States has not found records of the lands in tribal custody. If the land is not in trust, the state can enforce federal regulations that, under the Highway Beautification Act, prohibit this type of sign on certain roads.

Related Post:  Sultan: What will it take to get rid of the inherited preference in college admissions?

"Now it's up to NYSDOT to determine if there was a violation of the federal highway law and, if so, it's up to them and the New York attorney general to enforce it," spokeswoman Katie Vincentz said.

According to the BIA, the Shinnecock Nation has not sought any action or approval from this or the Eastern Region, Real Estate Services for this activity. A spokesman for the New York State Department of Transportation said the matter is still under review.

Hampton Bays resident Shane Morgan, a member of the beautification committee living at the end of Sunrise, attended the rally in support of his neighbors, who will be most affected by the billboards.

"The value of my property will go down, there is destruction of the natural habitat of the animals. I do not think it's fair for people who live in the neighborhood to see a neon glow at night. It's not very nice, "he said." We're here to, hopefully, preserve Mother Nature, the natural habitat of the animals and the beauty of the Hamptons. "

He said he hopes to reach an agreement, possibly moving the signs to another part of the tribal land. He said he is tired of seeing the land destroyed before the projects are approved, and mentioned the moment when members of the Shinnecock Nation cut down hundreds of trees on Newtown Road to build a casino more than a decade ago. That plan was closed before it left a little after the city took the tribe to court.

"It's terrible," said Morgan, holding signs that said "Save our forest" and "Pines not signs" next to a man holding a sign that said "Peace + Preserve." "The trees cleared for no reason at the end."

Schneiderman said he believes the Shinnecock Nation has the right to erect the signals, but added that just because they can do something does not mean they should do it. Some residents of Shinnecock were present at the rally to document the event and hear what was being said.

"I am certainly aware of the Shinnecock Nation and its history, and we are not trying to make excuses for the way they were treated in the past," said the supervisor. "We certainly recognize your need for economic development, and we know that you can benefit your community in ways that do not detract from the area or harm other residents. We hope you will consider some of our concerns about traffic safety and some aesthetics, and we hope that they come to the table and consult us. "

Von Freddi said that the community members are interested in continuing a dialogue, asking the Shinnecock Nation to annul the plans until there is a more serious discussion about economic development.

"We are good neighbors who care about people, these huge billboards will forever change the character of our area," he said. "When I heard about this project, I was surprised, I wondered why they were not doing this in the Southampton reservation . I understand there is traffic, but there is so much traffic on the Montauk Highway every day. "

Hults said he has been in communication with the chairman of the Shinnecock Nation's Board of Trustees, Bryan Polite, who agreed to attend the civic association's next meeting on Monday, May 20 at the Hampton Bays Senior Center at 7 o'clock. pm to present the views of its people. and plans and take questions. Hults asked that the meeting, like the rally, be non-contentious. She said no protests, signals or rhetoric will be allowed.

Related Post:  How to get rid of anxiety quickly

[email protected]

The president of the Hampton Bays Beautification Association, Susan von Freddi, speaks at a rally on May 15 against the double-sided billboards that are being built along Sunrise Highway by the Shinnecock Indian Nation, with the hope that the two parties can reach an agreement.
Residents of Hampton Bays hold a sign that says "Peace + preserve", "Save our forest" and "Pines not signs" at a May 15 rally against the construction of two double-sided electronic posters of the Shinnecock Indian Nation .
Residents of Hampton Bays join in a May 15 demonstration against the construction of two 61-foot-tall, double-sided electronic boards from the Shinnecock Indian Nation.
Post bases with electrical wiring have been constructed for two double-sided electronic signs for the 61-foot tall structures that will be erected on the north and south side of the Sunrise Highway.
Hampton Bays Civic Association president Maria Hults said at a rally on May 15 that she hopes Shinnecock's Indian Nation will alter her plans to build two 61-foot tall double-sided electronic billboards along Sunrise Highway.
The Southampton city supervisor, Jay Schneiderman, said at a rally on May 15 that he understands the history of Shinnecock's Indian Nation and understands his financial needs.
The president of the Hampton Bays Beautification Association, Susan von Freddi, said at a rally on May 15 that the Shinnecock Indian Nation built two 61-foot tall double-sided electronic billboards that will forever change the character of the area.
The president of the Hampton Bays Civic Association, Maria Hults, speaks at a rally on May 15 against the double-sided electronic posters of the Shinnecock Indian Nation, saying they will interrupt the circadian rhythm of animals and people.
Post bases with electrical wiring have been constructed for two double-sided electronic signs for the 61-foot tall structures that will be erected on the north and south side of the Sunrise Highway.
The president of the Hampton Bays Beautification Association, Susan von Freddi, fears the effects of Shinnecock's Indian Nation billboards on drivers, people and the area, she said at a rally on May 15.
Although the president of the Civic Association of Hampton Bays, Maria Hults, requested that there be no posters at the May 15 rally, a local resident brought a billboard poster decorated with cigarette logos that read "Monumental disaster."
A resident of Hampton Bays holds a "Peace + preserve" sign at a rally against Shinnecock's Indian Nation construction of two 61-foot tall double-sided electronic signs along Sunrise Highway.
Supervisor of the city of Southampton, Jay Schneiderman, said at a rally on May 15 that his biggest concern is the driver's distraction from the two double-sided electronic billboards being built by the Shinnecock Indian Nation.

Source: https://indyeastend.com/news-opinion/rally-to-get-rid-of-signs/

Additional Tags for this post:
maria dolores rivero-torres  |  
You May Also Like :
==[Click 2x to CLOSE X]==
Trending Posts!

Sorry. No data so far.